<div dir="ltr"><div>The Public Interest Registry provides no substantive service to the registrant that could justify allowing them to set arbitrary prices for the reservation of domain names.  Domain name pricing shouldn't be able to be set arbitrarily for <i>any</i> TLD, so "to ensure parity with the gTLD agreements" is <i>not</i> an acceptable justification.  If parity with the gTLD agreements is desirable, then those agreements should be changed to bring them in line with the much more sensible pricing controls on .org.</div><div><br></div><div>The structure of the domain name system has ensured that the registries must be monopolies.  While there are valid technical reasons for this, it is obviously open to outrageous abuse.  ICANN's decision to place limits on pricing increases to limit this abuse was the correct choice, and abandoning those limits can only benefit corrupt officers of unscrupulous companies who would abuse the system for their personal gain.  If the Public Interest Registry wants to raise prices beyond what is necessary to provide<i> the actual service they're supposed to provide</i>--that is, a monopoly on the assignation of names under the .org TLD--they should present their case to registrants, and let <i>us</i> decide whether it's worth paying more for.  Paying $10,000 a year for a .org domain name so that a company officer can give themselves a higher salary, or so the company can engage in unspecified "advocacy work," is not an appealing prospect.  And to anyone who thinks, "that's silly, why would anyone charge $10,000 for a domain name," ask yourself, "why not?  If they have a monopoly on the service, what do they have to lose?"<br></div><div><br></div><div>The only way it would be acceptable for PIR to be able to set prices arbitrarily would be if ICANN abandoned its current model of allowing each TLD to be controlled by a single monopoly, and instead allow multiple registries per domain name.  Then, PIR could compete with other companies to provide the best service and price to potential registrants.  This would be a much less efficient system, however, and not in the public interest.  The current system is much better, and should be maintained, even if it means Jonathan Nevett can't give himself a raise.<br></div></div>