<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Aug 13, 2012 at 1:12 PM, Paul Eggert <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:eggert@cs.ucla.edu" target="_blank">eggert@cs.ucla.edu</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

<div class="im">On 08/14/2012 03:49 AM, James M Leddy wrote:<br>
<br>
&gt; * The common proposed fix is that we should be using &quot;human<br>
&gt;  presentable&quot; names and have a mapping from these names to the<br>
&gt;  actual timezones. Since that proposal, indeed since the inception<br>
&gt;  of desktop Linux/Unix, no one (as far as I know) has actually done<br>
&gt;  this<br>
<br>
</div>I happened to read this on my laptop which runs Ubuntu 12.04 and uses<br>
the tz database. I clicked on the time in the upper right-hand part<br>
of my screen, clicked on &quot;Time &amp; Date Settings&quot;, typed &quot;Beijing&quot;, and<br>
it automatically changed my desktop to Beijing Time aka CST.<br clear="all"></blockquote><div><br><br>For whatever it is worth, on Mac OS X (10.7.4), the System Preferences Time &amp; Date panel allows you to choose the time zone by clicking on a world map. Clicking on one place in China came up with a name like &#39;Yueying - China&#39; , so I typed &#39;Beijing - China&#39; and that was accepted (and the highlighted location moved nearer to where Beijing actually is).<br>

<br>So, Apple has done this job on Mac OS X, I think.<br><br>That&#39;s not a definitive for or against the addition  it is just a data point for consideration.<br></div></div><br>-- <br>Jonathan Leffler &lt;<a href="mailto:jonathan.leffler@gmail.com" target="_blank">jonathan.leffler@gmail.com</a>&gt; #include &lt;disclaimer.h&gt;<br>

Guardian of DBD::Informix - v2011.0612 - <a href="http://dbi.perl.org" target="_blank">http://dbi.perl.org</a><br>&quot;Blessed are we who can laugh at ourselves, for we shall never cease to be amused.&quot;<br>