<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=iso-8859-1"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><br><div><div>On Aug 16, 2014, at 4:58 AM, "Clive D.W. Feather" &lt;<a href="mailto:clive@davros.org">clive@davros.org</a>&gt; wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite">Lester Caine said:<br><blockquote type="cite">But if the original calculation of number of cycles for a second was<br>wrong everything is wrong now anyway? :(<br></blockquote><br>It's not calculated, it's defined. The second *is* that number of<br>oscillations of whichever atom it is,</blockquote><div><br></div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span><a href="http://www.bipm.org/en/si/si_brochure/chapter2/2-1/second.html">http://www.bipm.org/en/si/si_brochure/chapter2/2-1/second.html</a></div><div><br></div><div>"The second is the duration of&nbsp;9 192 631 770&nbsp;periods of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the two&nbsp;hyperfine levels of the ground state of the caesium 133 atom."</div><div><br></div><div>(Extra nerdery follows that; for those who are curious at what *temperature* that's measured:</div><div><br></div><div>"At its 1997 meeting the CIPM affirmed that:</div><br>This definition refers to a caesium atom at rest at a temperature of 0 K.<br>This note was intended to make it clear that the definition of the SI second is based on a caesium atom unperturbed by black body radiation, that&nbsp;is, in an environment whose thermodynamic temperature is&nbsp;0 K.&nbsp;The frequencies of all primary frequency standards should therefore be&nbsp;corrected for the shift due to ambient radiation, as stated at the meeting of the Consultative Committee for Time and Frequency in 1999.")<div><br></div><div><div><blockquote type="cite">and the metre *is* the length that&nbsp;makes the speed of light the defined number.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span><a href="http://www.bipm.org/en/si/si_brochure/chapter2/2-1/metre.html">http://www.bipm.org/en/si/si_brochure/chapter2/2-1/metre.html</a></div><div><br></div><div>"The metre is the length of the path travelled by light in vacuum during a time interval of 1/299 792 458 of a second."</div><div><br></div><div>although</div><div><br></div><div>"The original international prototype of the metre, which was sanctioned by the&nbsp;1st CGPM&nbsp;in 1889, is still kept at the BIPM under conditions&nbsp;specified in 1889."</div><div><br></div><div>presumably for the lulz.</div><div><br></div><div>The kilogram isn't quite so exotic:</div><div><br></div><div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span><a href="http://www.bipm.org/en/si/si_brochure/chapter2/2-1/kilogram.html">http://www.bipm.org/en/si/si_brochure/chapter2/2-1/kilogram.html</a></div><div><br></div><div>"The international prototype of the kilogram, an artefact made of platinum-iridium, is kept at the BIPM under the conditions specified by the&nbsp;1st&nbsp;CGPM&nbsp;in 1889 when it sanctioned the prototype and declared:</div><br>This prototype shall henceforth be considered to be the unit of mass.<br>The&nbsp;3rd CGPM&nbsp;(1901), in a declaration intended to end the ambiguity in popular usage concerning the use of the word "weight", confirmed that:</div><div><br><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span>The kilogram is the unit of mass; it is equal to the mass of the international prototype of the kilogram.<br>The complete declaration appears&nbsp;here.<br><br>It follows that the mass of the international prototype of the kilogram is always 1 kilogram exactly,&nbsp;m(<img alt="grand K" id="4d85013e-c671-4831-b779-64192d3abc3c" height="16" width="13" apple-width="yes" apple-height="yes" src="cid:3A64B9DD-9FC6-4191-BD0E-C531FEBD26C6">) = 1 kg.&nbsp;However, due to the inevitable&nbsp;accumulation of contaminants on surfaces, the international prototype is subject to reversible surface contamination that approaches&nbsp;1 g&nbsp;per&nbsp;year in mass. For this reason, the CIPM declared that, pending further research, the reference mass of the international prototype is that&nbsp;immediately after cleaning and washing by a specified method (PV, 1989,&nbsp;57, 104-105 and PV, 1990,&nbsp;58, 95-97). The reference mass thus&nbsp;defined is used to calibrate national standards of platinum-iridium alloy (Metrologia, 1994,&nbsp;31, 317-336)."</div><div><br></div><div>Planck units:</div><div><br></div><div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planck_units">https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planck_units</a></div><div><br></div><div>FTW.</div></body></html>